Marketing

Digital Marketing news of the week 10-7-2017

Elly Brookfield on July 10, 2017

THE DRUM: M&S, BOSE, FORD AND MORE UP FOR CHANNEL 4’s DIVERSITY AWARD

In an admirable move towards promoting greater mental health visibility in advertising, Channel 4 are gearing up to shortlisting their ‘Diversity Award’ this year. Agencies are facing rewards of up to £1m worth of airtime should they produce the most effective campaign.

The award began as an effort to promote inclusive ads, and focuses on a different issue each year. This year Channel 4 are looking at celebrating agencies who have focussed on non-visible disabilities such as depression, autism, deafness, Alzheimer’s and obsessive compulsive disorder.

This competition started two years ago, with the introduction of Channel 4’s ‘360 Campaign’. The broadcaster have recently published a report on the progress of the mission, which aims to:

“Partner, encourage, enable and hold ourselves and others to account… [for an] inclusive and diverse workplace and industry to become a reality: a place where we respect, embrace and harness the uniqueness of individuals and their talents.”

Seven brands have been shortlisted for the prize, including: Bose and Valenstein & Fatt (Grey London); BT and AMV BBDO; Ford and GTB; Lloyds and Adam&Eve; M&S and Valenstein & Fatt (Grey London); Panasonic and Brave; and Volvo and Valenstein & Fatt (Grey London).

“The ideas submitted this year were so compelling it emphasises just how important this award is,” said Jonathan Allan, sales director at Channel 4. “ £1m of airtime definitely helps brands really think about the way they approach their campaign strategies and the commercial success Maltesers’ winning ads experienced last year is a clear testimony to the power of putting diversity front and centre of the creative idea.”

 

MARKETINGTECH: MOBILE MARKETING SET TO GROW IN THE UK 

According to MarketingTech, we digital marketers are doing the right thing by investing more time and money into mobile.

Users are turning to their smaller screens to do more and more, and according to this article, a greater amount of companies’ time and effort is going to go into email campaigns and SMS messaging.

It’s natural we should feel conflicted about this new tactic. No one likes receiving texts from businesses, or about products we’re not interested in – it can feel like a huge invasion of privacy. But as a marketing opportunity, it has the potential to produce fantastic results.

Currently, only 50% of the businesses surveyed for this article currently have an SMS marketing strategy in place.

The company estimates that the number of consumers opting in to receive business communications will rise to 48.7 million in 2020. If accurate, this will make SMS the fastest marketing channel in the UK.  

This will also mean that more effort will be put into optimising email marketing campaigns and company websites, so that they work effectively on smaller screens.

 

ECONSULTANCY: FACEBOOK SPAMMERS BE GONE! SOCIAL MEDIA GIANTS TO DENOTE OVERSHARERS’ CONTENT IN NEWS FEED

In a move that makes us sure that Mark Zuckerberg is a frequent Facebooker himself, Facebook have introduced an initiative to “reduce the influence of…spammers” who spread low-quality content. Facebook plan to do this by updating the News Feed algorithm to “deprioritize” the content from users who share 50-plus links publicly a day. Hallelujah!

According to Adam Mosseri, Facebook’s News Feed VP, “One of our core News Feed values is that News Feed should be informative. By taking steps like this to improve News Feed, we’re able to surface more stories that people find informative and reduce the spread of problematic links such as clickbait, sensationalism and misinformation.”

Some have argued, however, that Facebook is essentially having its cake and eating it too by putting this change into action. This way, it’s not removing spamming users (maintaining their high levels of usage) but also keeping the public happy by not spreading low-quality links.

Effective or not, it’s a step in the right direction. Publishers and marketers should keep a close eye on the changes Facebook is making in the fight against “fake news” because there’s no guarantee that future changes won’t affect them.